Taking For Granted

There is much we take for granted…
Mom and Dad with Teresa
Mom and Dad with Teresa
From the organized living space we experience, and often treat like ungrateful children, to the people who should be closest to us and are often far, far away.
From the safety of striping on the highways that keep each of in our own respective places, to the controlling lights that stop and go on schedule.
From the parameters of hard earned freedoms that we seldom take interest in enough to vote, to the next gulp of air we breath that allows us more moments of time.

We take so much for granted.

While writing a paper for school during the past several weeks, it came to me that much of what I was referencing was a continued path of information back to some foundation deep in history. On the shoulders of men and women, what I believe from scripture has been expounded into great detail of study and presentation. It ends up that more of our time in study is focusing on what others have said about what the scripture means, than what the scripture itself utters.

This caused me a few hours of thinking, when I should have been writing!

What else do we take for granted?

My sister has been returning to Texas for several summers now and hanging out with mom and dad. Side trips to visit her kids, and grandbabies (multiple!), but having a base in mom and dad’s world. My parents have lived in my world of Alaska and Washington for over 20 years, and now are back in my brothers world. My sister, I know, is thankful to have this home base to branch out from, and I know my parents appreciate her being there. It’s not taken for granted the time each spend with the other – who knows how long we have to continue to enjoy these options.

This past month Teresa did something with them, and I wish I could have been the first to think of it, but I would also like to personally witness the same thing she experienced.

Channelview Brick
Channelview Brick
They went to every place mom and dad lived where we kids first took up residence! My wife only lived in one house her entire 18 years at home. The home I have the best memories in Seabrook was replaced a long time ago. My second most lived in house in Channelview burned down several years ago.
My mom took her dad back to a place of his youth. Nothing existed but some rocks and stones from the hearth and fireplace.

Fireplace Rock from Granddad Simmons House
Fireplace Rock from Granddad Simmons House
Yet, we take each memory for granted.

What else do we take for granted?

My wife is no longer able to talk with her dad. He passed about 3 months after we moved to Washington. It will be 11 years this September. The older each of us get, the more we realize those we depend on are no longer available. I am blessed my siblings are all alive and healthy, but I know plenty of others who have lost siblings to tragedy and sickness.

So, do not take their current presence for granted!

Along the way I have begun to understand my own mortality. Of course, I will live to 100 so it’s not like it will happen soon – but, what if? Those left behind will miss my unique personality! Amen? My wife and I started something some time back – it was not a conscious action, however, we live by this creed.

“Don’t leave the house without kissing the spouse.”

My wife and I are one, and much like is the custom of scripture we became one flesh, a family of two – each leaving respective homes and becoming one. (Mark 10:7) From the trunk, we begin a brand new branch. I do not take my wife for granted. She is more precious to me than my children and grandbaby. I will stand between her and all the stones that are thrown at us. At the same time, my kids are my special loves. I will stand between them and life, just like I do for my wife.

But I will not always be there, so do not take me for granted!

One other thought about the subject… Dr Joyce Brothers states, “Being taken for granted can be a compliment. It means that you’ve become a comfortable, trusted element in another person’s life.” There is almost a sweet anonymity in not being noticed. To a few, I am a comforting presence, and trusted. Hence, I do not have to be focused on, but we all know it’s good to be recognized every so often.  Yet, if you take for granted your person – health, retirement, etc., you will never be able to contribute in such a way to make up the deficit. 

Food for thought…

As I write I listen to a favored song written and sung by John Denver – okay. Crucify me. But there are no other popular songs that speak to me like his ballads of Alaska! I found this song on the internet and realized how beautiful it is, all over again! Of course, he’s been gone for nearly 17 years. He died in a plane crash the same week my favorite author passed. James Michener was 92. John Denver was 53. At death, John was younger than I am today, and James Michener is about 33 years older! Both made deep impacts on my life. The poet and the story teller – both of them.

I can only listen to their past. They have no future.

So, I leave you with this song as I listened to it this morning from his 1995 Windstar Symposium.

“All This Joy” 

All this joy, all this sorrow
All this promise, all this pain
Such is life, such is being
Such is spirit, such is love

City of joy, city of sorrow

City of promise, city of pain
Such is life, such is being
Such is spirit, such is love

World of joy, world of sorrow

World of promise, world of pain

Such is life, such is being

Such is spirit, such is love 


All this joy, all this sorrow

All this promise, all this pain

Such is life, such is being

Such is spirit, such is love

Such is spirit, such is love

Songwriters: JOHN DENVER    Published by: Lyrics © BMG RIGHTS MANAGEMENT US, LLC

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s