When Your Voice Is Gone

When Your Voice Is Gone:

This past week has put me into a corner of realization. What do I do if my voice is gone? And it is true my voice was silenced for a bit from the surgery, and it is different as a result of the surgery – I have a lisp and there are sounds hard to make. It will get better and return to normal after a while, but for a little time it is not what it was…

As a pastor, teacher, and someone who enjoys talking to people, then what to do if my voice is gone? True, I can write my message, publish my voice via my blog, but how do I have discourse with treasured family or friends? Conversation, even debate, is not a one way street. It’s two-way. It’s give, and take.

It seems we are living in times when the voice of protesters want the street to be a one-way direction. You are either with them, or against them. Protesters are more interested that their voice is to be the only voice heard. They are right. You are wrong. Nor are they interested in dialogue. We have seen a lot of this over the past few years and I’m not sure where these actions are taking us.

The challenge is learning how to live and speak when your voice has been lost to the noise of the protester.

What’s the power of the protester? One leads a chant, and seemingly without a true thought, others join the chant. The louder, the better. Drown out all opposing noises and voices. I’ve heard some of the chants from some of the most recent events, and I’m not sure that any of them believe what they are saying. It just sounds good, it’s got cadence, and it’s easy to repeat.

It’s evident there is no rational discussion taking place, and when one attempts to make it through the protesters voice, then the dissenter gets shouted down, threatened with job, life, and health.

This made me think of all the voices that are drowned out that can never have anything to say. You get to fill in the blank on this one, but have not we all been one of the ones that could not be heard for all the shouting of the other side? Please, take a moment and answer my poll.

Of all the voices being drowned out, what is lost is the conversation that could have been accomplished. No discourse. No bargaining table. No negotiations. No dialogue. No comprehension. No diplomacy. Not even an agreement that we can “Agree to Disagree.”

We have been around individuals like this, and perhaps it’s someone who speaks over everyone else at your job, or in your family. Their voice is more important than your voice. Their way, or the highway. And, we’ve probably learned a lot about ourselves when we are victimized by their belligerent style. It’s like dealing with a bad boss! We’ve all had them. But did you learn something about yourself while dealing with them? I read a good article from Michael Hyatt about the things you learn from bad bosses! Valuable lessons! [Source]

But what do you do when dealing with large groups who are worse than that bad boss? How do you respond when your voice is lost to the noise? What do you do when you feel like you are alone against the rising tide?

It was Gandhi who said, “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” It’s not what your voice can accomplish alone, but what you accomplish with your actions. Be what you wish the world to be. Be the genre of what you wish the world to become. When you are drowned out, then simply “be”. When your voice is gone, then simply “be”.

The one thing I suspect, the world is constantly changing and the pendulum is swinging from the left to the right. Just as we know the clothes in our closest make a fresh re-appearing every 20 years or so, the shoe will be on the other foot. Eventually.

We must learn how to give voice to the one who is being drowned out, or who has lost their voice to circumstances. Sometimes that’s you. Sometimes that’s me. But there is always someone victimized by the shout. Let’s return to using our voices in a normal tone, and having some real conversations about today.

If it is to be, it is up to me… 10 important 2 syllable words!

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